Determine The Gram Formula Mass Of Each Compound Below Principles of the Drug Administration II – Its Metabolism (Distribution)

You are searching about Determine The Gram Formula Mass Of Each Compound Below, today we will share with you article about Determine The Gram Formula Mass Of Each Compound Below was compiled and edited by our team from many sources on the internet. Hope this article on the topic Determine The Gram Formula Mass Of Each Compound Below is useful to you.

Principles of the Drug Administration II – Its Metabolism (Distribution)

In circulation, drugs are repeatedly bound to plasma proteins. Immediate access to tissues depends on blood flow and the ability of the drug to penetrate the tissues. Ease of penetration into tissues depends on lipid solubility, and concentration in cell membranes. A large part of any drug is distributed to tissues where it has no pharmacological action. In cases such as “shock” when tissue penetration is poor, the drug remains in the plasma at a high level without entering the tissue and this leads to toxicity. Special muscles take up drugs selectively. Most tissues of the central nervous system block the entry of polar (ionized) compounds. Lipid-soluble substances readily enter the concentration gradient, while sugars and amino acids are actively transported. This blood-brain barrier breaks down when there is meningeal inflammation. In equilibrium conditions, the drug is distributed between plasma water, plasma proteins and tissues. Because lipid-soluble drugs enter cells more easily, their plasma concentrations are lower compared to water-soluble drugs. With hemodialysis, water-soluble compounds can be removed from the circulation, but this does not work with lipid-soluble drugs. The magnitude of the response to any drug depends on the level of free drug at the receptor site. The level of free drug in plasma depends on two factors: Plasma protein binding and ease of distribution to other tissues.

Plasma protein binding: Plasma proteins, especially albumin form reversible complexes with circulating drugs. The degree of absorption depends on the plasma pH and the binding of the drug to the protein. When multiple drugs compete for absorption, the highest concentrations displace those with weak affinity. Acidic drugs will be removed from the protein complex when the body enters acidosis. Since protein binding is reversible, this has little effect on drug elimination.

Courage: Since most of the absorbed drugs pass through the liver, they are bound, metabolized and excreted in the bile. Hepatic metabolism of drugs occurs in two phases; stage I reactions include oxidations, reductions and hydrolysis; and phase II reactions include combining the initial compound or metabolites-acetylation, sulphation, O-methylation and glycine-conjugation. These products are water soluble and therefore excreted. Urinary excretion depends on the processes of

1. Glomerular filtration,

2. Active tubular excision and reabsorption,

3. Distribution of transactions.

Lungs: Basic compounds are selectively taken and separated from the general cycle.

Transfer to a location: The placenta behaves as a selective barrier. Lipid-soluble drugs with a molecular weight of less than 1000 diffuse freely from the mother to the fetal circulation, while water-soluble drugs diffuse only slowly. Since the drug elimination systems of the unborn child are still immature, severe toxicity will follow. A mechanism for removing the drug from the fetal circulation is through maternal redistribution.

Drug cessation: Drugs are removed from the body by

1. Metabolism in the liver and kidneys together

2. Excretion of the parent drug or its metabolites is mainly by the Kidneys, but also by the intestines, skin, lungs, sweat glands, breasts and salivary glands.

Drug administration: An effective and safe dose of any drug should be determined by considering body weight or surface area. Although general instructions about the dose are available, each dose must be tailored to each patient, based on their weight, the condition of vital organs such as the kidneys and liver, the severity of the infection and the state of the immune system. Although a long course of treatment is suitable for treatment, but the possibility of toxicity reduces the total dose.

Video about Determine The Gram Formula Mass Of Each Compound Below

You can see more content about Determine The Gram Formula Mass Of Each Compound Below on our youtube channel: Click Here

Question about Determine The Gram Formula Mass Of Each Compound Below

If you have any questions about Determine The Gram Formula Mass Of Each Compound Below, please let us know, all your questions or suggestions will help us improve in the following articles!

The article Determine The Gram Formula Mass Of Each Compound Below was compiled by me and my team from many sources. If you find the article Determine The Gram Formula Mass Of Each Compound Below helpful to you, please support the team Like or Share!

Rate Articles Determine The Gram Formula Mass Of Each Compound Below

Rate: 4-5 stars
Ratings: 3841
Views: 23491874

Search keywords Determine The Gram Formula Mass Of Each Compound Below

Determine The Gram Formula Mass Of Each Compound Below
way Determine The Gram Formula Mass Of Each Compound Below
tutorial Determine The Gram Formula Mass Of Each Compound Below
Determine The Gram Formula Mass Of Each Compound Below free
#Principles #Drug #Administration #Metabolism #Distribution

Source: https://ezinearticles.com/?Principles-of-the-Drug-Administration-II—Its-Metabolism-(Distribution)&id=5865689