How Many Tablespoons Are In A Scoop Of Formula Reactive Hypoglycemia and Weight Training: What You Should Be Eating!

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Reactive Hypoglycemia and Weight Training: What You Should Be Eating!

If you’re anything like me when it comes to weight training, or exercise time for that matter, you’ll hate missing a workout! When I started having problems with Reactive Hypoglycemia or Idiopathic Postprandial Syndrome, it affected everything!

I couldn’t eat like before. I couldn’t exercise as hard as I used to. I didn’t know what was going on, what to do and I couldn’t seem to get a straight answer from anyone about what I should do…and yes, anyone including my doctors!

So, I had to try to beat this on my own. Dizzy spells, panic attacks, hypoglycemic episodes, weakness, fatigue, shaking, heart palpitations… and, well, I did!

I haven’t found the perfect formula during the day! It took almost 2 months to get my diet down and my body in balance.

I researched everything on the net. I talked to dietitians, nutritionists, body builders, personal trainers and honestly tried to avoid doctors, they seemed to make it worse!

To keep things short, and to do well to make the heart of something “active” (for me anyway), I found that a diet high in fat, protein, fiber and very low carbohydrates kept me from having any episode. ! That’s right! My diet stopped my episodes all together and for good!… but don’t ask your doctor about this, because chances are they have no idea and want to stick you on some medication!

Hopefully by now you know that eating refined foods, simple carbohydrates and sugars, caffeine and alcohol will cause you (a person with Reactive Hypoglycemia or Idiopathic Postprandial Syndrome) to have an episode. However, if you’re working out, you’re definitely going to need some carbohydrates right?… Complex carbohydrates that is!… but getting the perfect amount and knowing how to eat them is key!

What I did when I first changed my diet was to go on a Ketogenic diet for about 5 days straight. (You should do more research on the Ketogenic diet. It’s basically a diet that causes your body to switch from burning carbohydrates as a fuel source to burning fat as a fuel source.) I recommend not working and consulting someone knowledgeable about this diet (or your doctor, if they really know about it) before do this.

I can’t tell you how long you will need to stay on the Ketogenic diet, it will vary from person to person. However, after you think you have reached ketosis (a state where your body burns fat as a source of energy), you should be ready to re-introduce a small amount of complex carbohydrates (raw oatmeal) back into your body to help you through work. . If you are going to train, and especially hard training, you will need some form of carbohydrates.

Making the switch from carbohydrates as a fuel source to fat as a fuel source will not be fun at first! You will be tired, confused and powerless! However, your blood sugar is stable. Also, consult someone knowledgeable about this diet before you start.

Now, when you have gone “x” period of time on the Ketogenic diet (the amount of time depends on each person), start having small amounts of carbohydrates in the morning like raw oatmeal (a quarter to a half cup with butter and/or coconut oil if you are training weight) . The important thing here is to eat this with butter, heavy cream and/or a spoonful of coconut oil. This will slow down the absorption of carbohydrates and keep your insulin levels from spiking. This is important to prevent an active hypoglycemic episode. So remember that as a general rule; whenever you eat complex carbohydrates, make sure you eat them with fat.

Depending on your day, and how intense your workout will be, you may want to have a quarter to half a sweet potato for lunch with butter and a tablespoon of coconut oil. Along with every meal, have protein and fat like steak, cottage cheese, whey protein, peanut butter, etc. half an hour. Your body will adapt and it will return to normal.

Now, it’s time to exercise, what are you doing? Well, remember, your diet should always match your activity. So, you need to take enough carbohydrates to carry out your work (think about the intensity and duration of the training), but not too many carbohydrates that take your body out of ketosis (that is full where your body burns fat as a source of energy). Your complex carbohydrates from breakfast and lunch may work well, but, if you’re doing high-intensity training, you may want to try eating 2 to 4 glucose tabs while you work out. These tabs are made with Dextrose and are instantly absorbed and will be used immediately to provide energy to help you complete your workout.

Now, if you eat regularly for 2 to 2 and a half hours a day, you will be eating about 7 meals a day, give or take, and only 2 of those meals will include small servings of complex carbohydrates depending on your activity for the day. . Some foods you should include are whey protein shakes, cottage cheese, steak, eggs, fish, bacon, almonds, peanuts, peanut butter, decaf coffee and heavy cream, etc. my website.)

There are many unknowns in all of this because obviously everyone is different. It takes some people 5 days to reach Ketosis and some people 10 days to reach Ketosis on the Ketogenic diet. Some people may do well with half a bowl of oatmeal in the morning for exercise while others may need a quarter to half a sweet potato and glucose tablets. You have to learn by trial and error what works for you. Keep a detailed food journal and adjust your diet as needed, but remember the key points here. Avoid sugar, refined foods, simple carbohydrates, caffeine or alcohol. Eat more fat, protein, fiber and when you do eat your small amounts of complex carbohydrates, eat them with fat. Eat small meals every 2 to 2 and a half hours throughout the day, and stay consistent! This is the key to stopping your episodes!

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